Do It For Katniss! Food Activism and The Hunger Games

(Originally posted here on HandPicked Nation)

“Starvation’s not an uncommon fate in District 12. Who hasn’t seen the victims? Older people who can’t work. Children from a family with too many to feed…Starvation is never the cause of death officially. It’s always the flu, or exposure, or pneumonia. But that fools no one.” These are the words of Katniss, the main character of Suzanne Collins’s immensely popular novel for teens, The Hunger Games, on her community’s constant struggle with hunger.

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Even if you have never read the books, it has been impossible to ignore the hype around the movie The Hunger Games, released today, March 23. Adapted from the first book of Collins’s trilogy, the film is already set for a successful opening weekend, with packs of young (and not so young) adults waiting for the record-breaking midnight showing on Thursday night.

The Hunger Games and the two other books in the series are preoccupied with, as the name might suggest, hunger. Hunger dogs Katniss from her home district, where she illegally hunts for game to feed her family, to the Hunger Games themselves, where she must fight other teenagers to the death while trying to survive starvation and thirst. Katniss lives in a dystopian future version of North America in which the United States dissolved centuries ago to be replaced by a despotic Capitol ruling over thirteen subjugated districts. To ensure their cooperation, the Capitol requires two child “tributes” from each district every year to compete in the Hunger Games, a brutal challenge in which the winner is the sole remaining survivor.

The books certainly have a clear point to make about food and hunger. Hunting, for example, is illegal, although the forest’s game could easily support Katniss’s district. Instead, she and all of the district’s residents are forced into debt by purchasing rations of grain from the Capitol. The inhabitants of the Capitol, on the other hand, binge and purge in order to indulge in their feasts to the fullest. The alimental divide between the haves and the have-nots in the world of the novel is sharp, unforgiving, and, in so many ways, not the stuff of fiction at all.

Like the Harry Potter series before it, The Hunger Games series has gathered a passionate fanbase. And like Harry Potter, community organizers are attempting to harness the power of that fanbase to effect real change in the arena of global hunger. The Harry Potter Alliance, a fan activist group organized in the name of J. K. Rowling’s series, has begun a social campaign called Hunger is Not a Game in the hopes of educating fans of The Hunger Games series on the real problem of global hunger. The beauty of such campaigns, as one New York Times article writes, is that it offers kids and teens “the chance to be a hero like Harry,” providing the framework for their enthusiasm and passion to find an outlet in real-world problems. Hunger is Not a Game is working in conjunction with OXFAM and its GROW campaign to raise awareness of hunger in the United States and abroad and work toward the goals of OXFAM’s five-point plan. Using the movie’s launch on Friday as a focusing point, the campaign urged contributors to start food drives during the month of March and collect on the night of the premiere in movie theaters throughout the country.

The Hunger Games movie itself has partnered with the World Food Programme and Feeding America, using the film’s plot and characters to both educate visitors to the website and call those visitors to action by asking for donations to both organizations.

Dystopian fiction, a genre of which The Hunger Games is undeniably a part, is meant to force the reader to not only think about the future, but to think about the present. Even more importantly, the reader should take action within that present to prevent the dismal fictional future from coming to pass. Part of the excitement surrounding this film, for me, is that it is doing exactly what it is meant to do – both entertain and foster real social change.

So how about you, have you read The Hunger Games series? Know someone who has? How else do you think the book could be used to engage the YA audience in issues of food and sustainability?

New on the Internets

Check it out! This past weekend saw the launch of a new site dedicated to the sustainable food movement, HandPicked Nation, featuring, in their words, “Real food. Real life. Served fresh daily.” The site’s founders are originally involved in film production, so the site features some great original videos and interviews, as well as some really great written content. I am in no way saying this because they’ve included one of my articles for the launch. Of course.